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About Gao Zhisheng


Gao Zhisheng is one of the most unyielding and iconic advocates for justice in China having been nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Prize (2008 and 2010). In response to Gao's legal defense of human rights activists and religious minorities and his documentation of human rights abuses in China, Gao has been disbarred, and harassed, imprisoned and tortured numerous times.


[Read Gao's Full Story]

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Monday, September 15, 2014

Press Statement by Wife of Gao Zhisheng, on 9/8/2014

Press Statement by Wife of Gao Zhisheng, on 9/8/2014 

Published: September 12, 2014
English version published by chinachange.org

Geng He (耿和), wife of Chinese human rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng (高智晟), held a press conference on September 8, 2014, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., appealing to the U. S. government and the international community to help bring Gao Zhisheng to the U.S. to receive medical treatment and reunite with his family. With her permission, the following is a translation of her statement. - The Editor

Good morning ladies and gentlemen,

My husband Gao Zhisheng is a Chinese lawyer. Throughout his career, he has been dedicated to defending the rights of disadvantaged groups in Chinese society and providing pro bono legal services to them. Standing against the power of the state, he used his legal expertise to educate the general public and to disseminate the concept of justice and human rights. He fought and won justice for victims with his knowledge of the law and his eloquence of expression, establishing a strong reputation and earning the respect of many in China.

The Washington Post: China’s human rights abuses demand a tougher U.S. approach

The Washington Post
The Post's View
By Editorial Board September 14 at 6:56 PM

THEY KEPT him in a cell so small he could walk barely two steps in any direction. There was no sunlight, no ventilation; just one five-watt bulb, burning dimly 24 hours a day. He was allowed nothing to read and no one to speak with, not even the guards. They fed him one piece of bread and one bowl of watery cabbage a day.

The Diplomat: A Major Setback to the Rule of Law in China

Image credit: Medill DC via flickr.com
The Diplomat
By Jared Genser

With its treatment of Gao Zhisheng, Beijing shows the extent to which it fears the rule of law.
About a month ago and with little fanfare, the Chinese government released renowned Chinese rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng from Shaya County prison in Western China. He is now under house arrest, denied access to medical care, and convalescing from horrific and punishing torture. While at first blush, one might conclude his case is that of only a single dissident in an enormous country, a closer look reveals a lot about modern China and Beijing’s fundamental unwillingness to acknowledge and provide real remedies for people’s grievances.